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It's okay to be creepy on Thanksgiving.

I deliberately take time during the days leading up to Thanksgiving to reflect on everything for which I am thankful.  I know I said that last year, but it never hurts to repeat it.  My "thankful" list is always long.  I do not take anything for granted, especially since the last few years have been so turbulent for me.  I've realized that it doesn't take much to lose something (or someone) precious, and that is something that always comes to the front of my mind at this time of year.

This year, I've been reflecting in a different way.  I've noticed that a lot of people are doing the "30 Days of Thankful" lists on Facebook (mentioning something every day for which they are grateful).  I, personally, have been avoiding Facebook for the past few weeks after my hometown imploded with the scandal of the century, and I couldn't stand the shallow-mindedness and hatred anymore (but that's an entirely different blog for a different day).  Rather than a public declaration of thankfulness, I've been doing it in a more introspective way.

I learned years ago that people are connected by energy.  For example, if you have a dream about somebody, it means that they were thinking of you rather than the other way around.  Additionally, thinking positively about someone who is ill or sad will send healing energy to them and make them well and happy (although I am not religious, I know this is what makes people believe in the power of prayer, because it is essentially the same thing - just using a god as a middle man).

I've known a few people to be struggling recently, so I've been taking a minute every day to concentrate on a positive thought for them, sending them some good energy that hopefully makes them feel a little better.  Now that Thanksgiving is approaching, I've been doing the same thing for anyone who comes to mind.  Sending a little bit of love to those who inhabit my head and/or heart is far more beneficial to everyone than a Facebook note that nobody's going to read anyway.

So this Thanksgiving, when you feel happiness in your heart but aren't quite sure where it came from, you can smile in delight knowing it's just me.  Or maybe shudder in your boots, because that admittedly does sound a little weird.  But I'm not trying to be creepy.  It's just that I'm thankful for you... even if I don't always say it.

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